5. Succinct Logic-Sequences for the Seven Values

The last chapter explained the progression from Values to The Graces of Expressed Ethics. In this chapter they are succinctly summarized. 11

The Decision-Logic Sequence Of Morality And Ethics

➔ Seven Values  ➔ Moral Definitions  ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics  ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

A Brief Summary

  • Life is the Ultimate Value.
  • Equality, Growth, and Quality of Life are the values that sustain the survival of our species.
  • Empathy, Compassion, and the “Love” for humanity are the values that make it possible to sustain social existence.

Seven Values Have Sustained Our Species' Survival

The “rules” for social existence are the morality and ethics that develop out of the logic-relationship of the seven values and their mutual characteristics.

  •  Values underlie the decisions responsible for the survival of our species;
     
  •  Moral Definitions provide the rules that guide human decisions and actions to prevent destructive life-altering behavior of human interaction;
     
  •  Ethics Statements tell us HOW TO fulfill Moral Definitions;
     
  •  Expressed Ethics tell us WHAT TO DO to fulfill Ethics Statements;
     
  •  The Graces of Expressed Ethics are the states of being that smooth social interaction.

Values

Life ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Assign value in all of your decisions to protect and value life.

Ethics Statements: Protect and give value to all life (Buddhist). Take the life of other species only for your meals. Do not to take the life of species for sport, or to sell protected species.

Expressed Ethics: Acceptance, validation, patience, tolerance, forgiveness, and vulnerability, for example, are necessary to support the social existence of families, communities, and societies.

NOTE: The Graces of Expressed Ethics (TGoEE) apply equally to all Expressed Ethics and are not duplicated for each value in the following sequences. They are the natural outgrowth of Expressed Ethics as their name indicates. They take the form of being kind, considerate, caring, confident, generous, meek, mild, modest, strong but humble, thoughtful, patient, tolerant, positive, and friendly for only a very few of many possible examples. These are not necessary to be moral or ethical, but provide a “grace” to ethical living.

For example, Growth is a primary value. Proactive Moral Definitions tell us to make decisions and take action for improving the quality of life and unleashing the potential of others as you would for your self. Ethics Statements tell us how to “Assist others to grow into their innate potential just as you would for your self.” Expressed Ethics tell us what to do: Be fair, have integrity, acceptance and appreciation for that person. Graces of Expressed Ethics add a qualitative “texture” to our personal interaction with others. The Graces suggest that being kind, considerate, caring, confident, generous, meek, mild, modest, strong but humble, thoughtful, patient, tolerant, positive, and friendly will go a long way to make that person feel comfortable with the challenges that growth always provides.

Equality ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Make decisions and take action for improving the quality of life and unleashing the potential of others as you do for your self.

Ethics Statement: Treat others as you do yourself means that you do not treat others less than your self; and it also means that you do not treat yourself less than you would treat others. The value of others is equal to that of your self, and your value is equal to that of others – act accordingly. The importance of this value is that others are not excluded from consideration, and from opportunities to grow and to improve their quality of life; and neither are you.

Expressed Ethics: To appreciate Equality at the roots of our humanity that emanate from our DNA, Expressed Ethics tell us “what to do” at the most basic level to fulfill “Equality.” When we see the expression of fairness, integrity, transparency, acceptance, appreciation, validation, worthiness, deservingness, honesty, authenticity, faithfulness, discretion, patience, tolerance, forgiveness, nurturance, and vulnerability we are seeing the expression of our humanness at its very best that supports the equality of others, and our self.

Growth  ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Make decisions and take action that create opportunities for you to develop your innate potential; and, whenever possible develop opportunities for others, and assist them to grow into their innate potential to improve their quality of life as you do for your self.

Ethics Statement: Assist others to grow into their innate potential just as you do for your self. Show others, as you are able, to recognize the opportunities that may be of assistance to them to grow and improve their quality of life.

Expressed Ethics: Fairness, integrity, transparency, acceptance, appreciation, validation, worthiness, deservingness, patience, tolerance, forgiveness, nurturance, and vulnerability are a few that support the growth of others.

Quality of Life ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Make decisions for yourself and others that improve the quality of your lives.

Ethics Statement: See others as an equal of your own life to know how to support your efforts to develop their innate potential to grow to improve their quality of life as you would for yourself. When making decisions or writing policies and laws put yourself on the receiving end to see how you would react, and adjust the parameters of your decisions according to the seven values.

Expressed Ethics: Fairness, integrity, transparency, acceptance, appreciation, validation, worthiness, deservingness, honesty, authenticity, faithfulness, discretion, patience, tolerance, forgiveness, and vulnerability support the quality of life of others, and our self.

* Empathy  (* = Secondary Value)  ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Extend your awareness past your own life to that of others.

Proactive Ethics Statement: Extend your awareness past your own life to that of others to sense their situation in the seven spheres of human existence: physical, mental, emotional, intellectual, social, cultural, and spiritual.

Expressed Ethics: Extend your awareness past your own life to that of others to sense their situation in the seven spheres of human existence: physical, mental, emotional, intellectual, social, cultural, and spiritual. Reflect on what you sense and compare that to your own awareness(es) of your own seven spheres of human existence.

All Expressed Ethics demonstrate “other-interest” contrasted to self-interest. “Other-interest” Expressed Ethics are typical of the secondary Value-Emotions. Self-interest is much more typical of primary values. We see the prevalence of this in the U.S. culture with its great “me-ism” of self-centered arrogance manifested as authority, power, and control. Yes, primary values do have Expressed Ethics attached to them, but as we have seen, it is always a matter of personal choice of expressing self- interest, a little of both, or predominately other-interest. Neither is “good” or “bad.” “Other-interest” works toward social sustainability while self-interest works predominately against it, at least at the local, tactical scale of social existence.

* Compassion  ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Based on our developed sense of empathy we choose to support the improvement of other’s quality of life and to grow into their innate potential, as we do for our self.

Proactive Ethics Statement: Based on your developed sense of empathy, take action to come to the aid of others, to support the improvement of their quality of life, and to grow into their innate potential equally as you do for your self.

Expressed Ethics apply equally to the three Secondary Value - Emotions because those Secondary Values act together. All Expressed Ethics demonstrate “other-interest” contrasted to self-interest that we see all too often.

* “Love”  ➔ Moral Definitions ➔ Ethics Statement ➔ Expressed Ethics ➔ The Graces of Expressed Ethics

Proactive Moral Definition: Love (noun) in the context of proactive morality is defined as the combined energies of empathy and compassion toward others, as you have for your self. This is truly the most developed definition of equality — to see and value others as you do for your self.

Proactive Ethics Statement: Love (verb), in the context of proactive morality, is defined as projecting the combined energies of empathy and compassion toward others. This is truly the most evolved definition of equality — to see and value others as you do for your self, and choose to act accordingly.

Expressed Ethics apply equally to the three Secondary Value-Emotions because those Secondary Values act together. All Expressed Ethics demonstrate “other-interest” contrasted to self-interest that we see all too often.

An Innate, Proactive Morality And Ethic

What is unique about this proactive morality and ethic is that they are inherent to the seven values that are embedded in our DNA. We were born with an innate sense of “right and wrong.” Immoral and unethical decisions and actions require a conscious volitional decision to violate those values and the innate morality and ethic we were born with. To me, this is proof that people, all people, are innately good.

A proactive morality and ethic as described in the preceding pages offer a holism to all of human behavior — one that offers the possibility of drawing individuals, families, communities, national societies and our global civilization into a socially sustainable future and peace. By using this proactive, innate morality and ethic, we will immediately recognize what is moral or immoral, what is ethical and what is not. Only a proactive morality and ethic as this is capable of creating indigenous, positive social and cultural change, a first stage of social evolution and sustainable peace. It is simply a matter of using those values, morality, and ethic in billions of daily decisions made by billions of citizens, organizations, and social agencies.

For complex and developed democratic societies the seven values provide a code of moral and ethical logic for developing decisions with clear and unambiguous outcomes, for everyone, equally. This innate, proactive morality and ethic offer nine functions to sustain future generations:

1. To define the proactive moral and ethical decision-making and behavior of individuals and organizations that contribute to the social stability, social sustainability, and peace of individuals, families, communities, and societies.

2. To clearly define immorality and unethical behaviors as those that violate one or more of the seven values, and,

a) destroy the potential of (an)other citizen(s) to make a positive contribution to the sustainability of themselves, their family, community or society.

b) behavior that diminishes the capacity of a citizen(s) to make a contribution to society;

c) behavior that squanders the resources of society as it works toward social sustainability; and
 
d) behavior that requires society to come to the aid of an injured citizen to recoup their capacity to make a contribution to the sustainability of themselves, their family, community, or society; or, support them in their incapacity for their lifetime or until they are healed.

3. To clearly define social predators 12 as those individuals and organizations that take actions as those above, a-d, that violate the morality of a society that is moving toward a peaceful future. Those individuals and organizations create an immense drag on society’s forward inertia to achieve social stability and peace. (Most federal and state criminal codes offer numerous examples of predatory behavior.)

The actions of social predators are in opposition of the efforts of society to develop the innate potential of people individually and collectively, and greatly retard the maturing social evolution of our societies and cultures. How they are dealt with by courts that have adopted the logic of these values and morality is a question that cities, counties, states, the nation, and nations collectively will have to determine, eventually. Whatever sanctions are meted out must as well work to fulfill society’s intent to become fully socially sustainable.

4. A proactive model of morality and ethics clearly points to the long term benefits of proactive decisions made by individuals and organizations that use it. Doing so, organizations and individuals then become symbiotically entwined, socially stable, peaceful, and eventually more sustainable.

5. A morality and ethic that are based on these values provides a decision-making process with results that are consistent with the inherent characteristics of those values. In a symbiotically entwined relationship between individuals and organizations, this morality and ethic inherently assigns reciprocal value and responsibilities to individuals, families, and organizations. Symbiotically, each individual/family is seen as a “social asset” whose contributions to organizations ensure that society becomes socially sustainable, and organizations’ contribution to the individual supports their growth to make that contribution.

6. The benefit of a proactive, sustaining morality and ethic acts as a guide for strategic planners for developing congruent short and long term goals. Planning for the achievement of short and long term goals will be made easier because option-development, choice-making, decision-making, and action-implementation will be guided by the logic and integrated nature of these values.

7. Moral and ethical behavior that is generated by the use of these values is fully complemental to our human nature. These values are embedded in our DNA, and are an innate part of who we are. People are naturally and innately good — the genuine and authentic nature of us all — evidence of our true human nature.

Social predators, those who choose to use their own priorities of what benefits them, define themselves as not human — NON-human. The moral implications of that statement may cause a great deal of heated discussion among traditional moralists and ethicists. The furor of the discussion will lie in how to prevent the appearance of social predators, and what to do with those who are entrenched in such decision-making and behavior.

8. Prosecuting attorneys will have consistently logical, moral, ethical, and rational arguments in the courts for dealing with individuals, organizations and their executives, social agencies, and global agencies who choose to work against the sustainability of individuals, communities, societies, and national publics. Having a consistent, integrated, and permanent morality and ethic to guide the development of laws and social policies that support social sustainability is essential to bring the decisions of thousands of local, national, and international social agencies into complemental alignment.

9. Intentionally developing integrated social systems in a society is a major shift in culture, and the thinking of individuals. As population increases beyond the quantity needed to sustain a society, the less quality of life is available to everyone equally, and the less value each new citizen has. This is contrary to our historic moral roots where the value of each person is seen as being unique and valuable as they are.

The reaction we have seen in middle and upper-middle class families is an increased value-investment made in each child, while the value-investment of economically marginalized children decreases. Giving value to individuals is evidence in more socially conscious groups for the necessity of an integral wholeness of our societies. We are beginning to give value to the integral wholeness of our society, even as we witness the disparate aggregation of racial, ethnic, national, and religious groups tear our societies apart politically.

Traditional Morality

As comparison, the moral code of western civilization has historically changed very little over the last 4,000 years 13 from the time that Sumerian King Ur-Nammu of Ur (2112-2095 BC) wrote it. It was later adopted by Hammurabi and Moses, among others. It was written as a set of rules for preserving and maintaining social order and the functioning of society through a uniform standard of social conduct, i.e., a moral code.

It was designed as a personal morality within a small community. It was never codified as a social morality to guide the moral conduct of social processes, organizations, governments, or corporations. Neither was it intended as a global moral code for nations of the international community. The development of the traditional moral code, however, was an incredible advancement in normalizing social relations at the time.

The traditional moral code is man-made using the values that King Ur-Nammu and his advisors thought would be of help. Because the traditional moral code was based on man-made values, rather than being based on the innate values of our species, it has not been able to keep pace with the social evolution of people. That moral code is not capable of evolving with the evolution of people’s needs to improve the quality of their lives. To improve the conditions (read, “social evolution”) of our lives today, the moral and ethical needs of our evolving contemporary communities and societies also need to evolve. Because the seven values are proactive to encourage our growth, social change is a permanent and inherent aspect of the value system of our species.

Invalid Assumptions. King Ur -Nammu’s moral code is retrospective and punitively based. One of its assumptions has been that the punishment of immoral behavior would cause citizens to become moral in order to avoid subsequent punishment. We know all too well from the history of four millennia that punishment is not an effective deterrent to immoral behavior.

What is wrong with this traditional moral code? Nothing really, as long as it is applied as an unevolved person-to-person morality in very simple communities. But when it is applied by a social agency (courts of law, juvenile, divorce, and custody litigation for example) its performance comes up short. What is missing is an evolved, proactive morality that empowers social agencies, as the courts and numerous other social agencies to determine the sustaining needs of litigants and of society.

Historical Corrections. Perhaps the greatest fallacious assumption of the traditional moral code is that it tries to correct the behavior of the wrongdoer, a very familiar theory of “modern” criminal “corrections.” When we look more closely at its “corrective” function, we soon realize that it proposes the ludicrous notion of correcting the faults of the past. Because this type of reactive punishment occurs after the fact of the immoral behavior, it is truly 100% ineffective. Further, Ur-Nammu’s moral code does nothing to proactively improve our societies. It simply punishes the wrongdoer with the victim, family, community, and the public no better for the wrongdoer’s punishment. Said another way, the incarceration of a murderer does not bring about an improvement in the social sustainability of the community from which he or she came.

Reactive, Not Proactive. The traditional moral code provides only a moral accounting of righting wrongs, never urging citizens to aspire to higher moral standards of living, or to add to the quality of their life, or the lives of others by the decisions they make. The old morality provides no incentive for proactive good behavior, other than to avoid getting caught.

Because the traditional moral code has not been proactive to work toward social sustainability, after centuries of its use we have begun to see the moral and social disintegration of whole communities in our larger cities due to drug use, violence, property crimes, and sexual, physical, emotional, mental, and social abuse of infants, children, and the elderly. Social status and economic elevation have not exempted members from family abuses, community delinquency by adults or fiscal or political malfeasance by executives with their victims numbering in the tens of thousands and totaling in the millions.

Bad Code. From a contemporary technological perspective, the traditional morality of western civilization for the last 4,000 years is a form of morality that in computer terms is “bad code.” It is “bad code” because it is not based on a logically integrated set of values. It may solve some problems but not others, and it may solve problems inconsistently depending upon who is using it.

Grievously, the ethics that emerge from the “bad code” of traditional morality do not provide a universally level playing field for all people of all races, cultures, ethnicity, nationality, and gender for all times.

A Conclusion. The traditional morality that all of us have been raised with is based on man-made values that are interpretations of the seven innate values. As man made interpretations they are not capable of enduring the rigors of time and vast array of moral challenges that have come about over the centuries and millennia. The far better and sustaining values that need to be used are the seven innate values set in a proactive moral code of decision-making for all people, all organizations, and for all time. These values are in innate alignment with each individual because they are already a part of each of us.

Minimal Moral Duty

In the frame of three simple proscriptive definitions, where “social sustainability” is defined as the morality of the four primary values:

  •  No individual shall diminish or impede the social sustainability of another person, organization, or association of organizations without moral justification.
     
  •  No organization shall diminish or impede the social sustainability of another organization, individual, or association of organizations without moral justification.
     
  •  No association of organizations shall diminish or impede the social sustainability of another association of organizations, organization, or individual without moral justification.


11 Raphael, Daniel 2018 Making Sense of Ethics — A Unique, Unified Normative Theory of Ethics, Morality and Values, from Chapter 5, “Succinct Logic-Sequences of the Seven Values” p 55-
12  Social predators includes any person, and those person(s) acting in behalf of an organization, whose actions cause life-altering changes in the victim(s); and include embezzlement, incest, all forms of violence against the victim(s), and all financial actions of self-interest that result in losses to the general public, and others, for example.
13 Link 1; and, Link2