Part 3 provides the venue for addressing the work given to us in Part 2. Democracies have always had their beginnings when local citizens became outraged at how the ruling establishment had trampled their natural rights. Now, centuries and decades later those original forms of democracy have become aged and out of date with the evolving needs of citizens. Only an evolved and adaptable form of democratic process can do that, without violence, revolt, or revolution to become more effective, and in tune with local community citizens.

Doing so will restore the greatness of democratic nations by once again involving local community citizens more directly in their own governance in this new element of the democratic process.

The responsibilities of social sustainability
are not silly expressions of philosophic idealism but opportunities that
assure future generations are capable of continuing our democratic
traditions for an improving quality of life, with even greater opportunities to
grow into their individual potential, and the potential of their society.

Faithful fulfillment of our responsibilities today for our children’s
great grandchildren will assure that there will be a better society,
better democracy, and more equitable economy than we have today.