Chapters 8-12 provide the standards of performance for sustainably designed social institutions and organizations to become and remain effective into the centuries ahead to ensure that democratic societies become and remain socially sustainable.

“What can we do today to begin creating (this social institution) as a major contributor to the centuries-long social sustainability of a democratic nation?”

Part 2 identifies seven social institutions that support the social structure and functioning of democratic nations, that came into existence without a conscious intention for their existence to contribute to the social sustainability of those nations. Without that intention the work of these institutions has become insular, uncoordinated, and self-serving. Each chapter examines a major social institution and provides the standards of performance for that social institution to make a meaningful and effective contribution to the social sustainability of the nation — any democratic nation.

Chapter 7, Sustainable Families, The Fabric of Sustainable Societies, (p. 73). What can we do today to create the family as a major contributor to the centuries-long social sustainability of democratic nations?

This chapter briefly describes what makes the family the fabric of sustainable democratic societies and the pivotal element of sustainable societies, all organizations, and democratic nations. It also describes what to do to retrain the family as the premiere social institution for the socialization and enculturation of each and every new generation.

Chapter 8, Finance and the Economy, (p. 85). What can we do today to create finance and the economy as major contributors to the centuries-long social sustainability of democratic nations?

Of the major social institutions that have the most influence to support the social sustainability of democratic societies, or to crush that possibility, finance and the economy is only second to the family as having the most powerful effect. And it is only second to a global nuclear holocaust to destroy that possibility. In a global economic melt down, even “3rd world” nations feel the devastating effects because of the extensiveness of interrelated national economies. Perhaps it is time that as much attention as is given to reducing the risk of a nuclear holocaust is also given to reducing the risk of an economic holocaust.

Chapter 9, Public Education’s Moral Obligation to Co-Create a Socially Sustainable Nation, (p. 93). What can we do today to create public education as a major contributor to the centuries-long social sustainability of democratic nations?

To fulfill this question public education must create culture-change to support the work of the family — the social foundation for all democratic nations. Public education’s role of the future is to move from an unconscious to a conscious intention to “bend the culture” of a democratic society and nation toward social sustainability. Historically, education was used to prepare young minds for entering the work force; and it has also become a symbol of intellectual prowess if only for education’s sake.

For a nation that has chosen as its intention to transcend the failure of all historic nations, then education must as well have the intention to prepare each new generation for making a transcending contribution to the social sustainability of all future generations. Inherent in that intention, both for the nation and public education, is the necessary enculturation and continued socialization of every new generation with the seven values, morality, and ethic that are innate to our species. In this regard, public education is co-responsible with the family to fulfill those ends.

Chapter 10, Health Care, (p. 99). What can we do today to create health care as a major contributor to the centuries-long social sustainability of democratic nations?

The quality of health care given equally to all citizens is reflective of the social and moral maturity of any nation. In a society that has chosen to transcend its past, all citizens are seen as social assets with the innate capability of making immense contributions to the social sustainability of their own lives, their families, and to their nation.

Nations can survive solely by using the four primary values that are innate to our species, (life, equality, growth, and quality of life), but to transcend the past that nation must also must express the three secondary values that are also innate to our species — empathy, compassion, and a generalized “Love” for humanity. In the terms of the seven values, morality, and ethics the acts of omission and commission by nations that do not provide equal health care, regardless of individual circumstances, is immoral.

Chapter 11, Justice, (p. 105).  What can we do today to create justice as a major contributor to the centuries-long social sustainability of democratic nations?

The quality of justice, whether by police, courts, or corrections, is also reflective of a nation’s social and moral maturity. The expression of the values of a democratic nation are highly visible in terms of the results provided by the three arms of justice. It becomes necessary when a nation has chosen to transcend its past to examine in detail those values, to identify them, and to thoroughly understand their origins and appropriateness of justice’s expression. Justice that uses an evolved proactive morality that supports a nation’s advance toward social stability, domestic peace, and on to social sustainability will cause no small amount of cultural and social dissonance to many readers.

Chapter 12, Religion, (p. 111). “What can religions do intentionally, as major contributors to the centuries-long sustainability of all nations, to support and develop evolved socially sustainable societies?” If your religion is based on being a God-believer, or your god is money, power, positions of authority, control, and/or ego, then the question still applies.

Chapter 13, Democratic Governance, (p. 113). What can we do today to create a democratic process as a major contributor to the centuries-long social sustainability of democratic nations?

The evolution of the democratic process offers citizens in a mature democratic nation the uncomfortable position of initiating the next evolutionary state or revolting against an aged, decrepit, and antiquarian democratic process that no longer satisfies the evolved value interpretations of the original values that once satisfied the founders of the democracy and the public. Asking the question, “What can we do to create an evolved democratic process as a major contributor to the centuries -long social sustainability of a democratic nation?” is the critical question that will initiate the peaceful development and political evolution of staid democratic processes. The needs for freedom and self-determination are as present today as they were in 1776, but the means to express them in the democratic process has withered over the decades and centuries.